6th Annual Weight Stigma Conference

Announcements

FYI. CFP: Social Cognition special issue: Social cognition and health

FYI.

Call for Papers
Social Cognition Special Issue: Social Cognition and Health

Editors: Jennifer Howell, University of California, Merced & Kate Ratliff, University of Florida

Although people are living longer than ever before, markers of ill-health persist. Many factors that influence the persistence of illness are psychological: poor health decision-making and behavior (e.g., eating, exercise, treatment adherence), the physical embodiment of poor social interactions (e.g., stigma, social rejection), and potentially harmful cognitions (e.g., rumination, stress). Thus, health is a consequential domain in which to explore, extend, and generalize social cognitive psychological theory.

In this special issue of Social Cognition, we invite papers at the intersection of social cognition and physical health, broadly defined. We welcome submissions examining how social cognition influences physical health and health behavior (e.g., social schemas and patient-provider interaction, neurological processes and physical health), how health and health behavior influence social cognition (e.g., processing of social stimuli as the result of illness or illness cues), or other investigations at the intersection of the two areas.

Consistent with the journal’s editorial statement, we define social cognition as any investigation involving the cognitive processes in social psychology and behavior including: (1) the processes underlying the perception, judgment, and memory of social stimuli; (2) the effects of social and affective factors on the processing of information; and (3) the behavioral and interpersonal consequences of cognitive processes.

We define physical health broadly including as sickness, wellness, health prevention/promotion behaviors, illness cognitions/representations, physiological well-being, physiological responses, and healthcare. Investigations only focused on mental well-being (e.g., happiness, quality of life) are not the primary focus of this special issue; however, we welcome research that examines mental and physical health in tandem.

Researchers wondering whether their study fits the definition of social cognition or health are encouraged to contact the special issue editors. Further, authors are encouraged to outline how their paper fits into the categories of social cognition and health in their cover letter.

For this special issue, we invite submissions in one of two formats:
Articles (no specified length) and Reports (no longer than 4,000 words excluding abstract, references, tables, and figures) and should follow the journal’s guidelines https://www.guilford.com/periodicals/jncoinst.pdf.

The timeline of the issue is as follows:

July 1, 2018–Submissions due via https://socog.msubmit.net
July 31, 2018–Reviews due
August 15, 2018–Review decisions sent to authors
September 30, 2018–Revised manuscripts due
October 31, 2018–Final manuscripts due to journal
April 2019–Issue published

We are excited to see your work at the intersection of social cognition and health and hope that you will consider this special issue an outlet for your research at the intersection of these two important fields!

Please contact Jennifer Howell (howell@ucmerced.edu) and/or Kate Ratliff (ratliff@ufl.edu) with any questions.

FYI. CFP: Special issue of Fat Studies – Standpoint theory in fat studies

FYI.

Special Issue of Fat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society on Standpoint Theory in Fat Studies, edited by Laurie Cooper Stoll (lcstoll@uwlax.edu) and Darci Thoune (dthoune@uwlax.edu).

To be considered for inclusion in this special issue, please send a 200-250 word abstract to Laurie Cooper Stoll at lcstoll@uwlax.edu by August 1, 2018.  Any questions should also be directed to this e-mail address.

The voices of fat people are often marginalized or excluded altogether when it comes to larger discussions of fat and “obesity” in our culture.  This includes the voices of those of us that do work in fat studies who are fat ourselves.  As Abigail Saguy (2013) points out, “Regardless of how many advanced degrees they have, researchers run the risk of being discredited if they themselves are fat, not only for all of the reasons that fatness is generally discrediting but also because they are perceived as biased” (35).  Standpoint theorists have long asserted the importance of positionality when it comes to engaging in research and activism.  According to Charlotte Cooper (2016: 32), “Who researches fat people and who creates knowledge about fatness is important.”  As such, Cooper argues we should take seriously the epistemology derived from fat people’s own experiences, yet “at present there is a gap between the objects and producers of knowledge. Standpoint, a researcher’s attitude and relationship to the research subject, tends to receive poor attention, perhaps a paragraph or sentence or two” (33).  This special issue on Standpoint Theory in Fat Studies seeks to address this shortcoming in the literature by centering the voices of fat scholars and activists.  Specifically, it takes up the questions:

1)      What does it mean to do fat studies as a fat scholar and/or fat activist?

2)      How does our social location as fat researchers and activists influence the types of research we conduct and/or the types of activism we engage in?

3)      How do we situate ourselves in relationship to our work?

4)      And how do we connect our work back to our everyday lived experiences?

In order to advance our understanding of the importance of standpoint theory in fat studies, we seek manuscripts that respond to the above questions using an intersectional lens that also considers the impact of race, class, gender, sexuality, ability status, and/or other systems of inequality on fat scholars and activists.  Final submissions should be between 3000-6000 words, including all notes and references. If you wish to include reproductions of visual images with your essay, you will need to receive permission to do so from the artists/copyright holders of the image(s).  All authors will need to sign a form that transfers copyright of their article to the publisher, Taylor & Francis/Routledge.

Fat Studies is the first academic journal in the field of scholarship that critically examines theory, research, practices, and programs related to body weight and appearance. Content includes original research and overviews exploring the intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, sexuality, age, ability, and socioeconomic status. Articles critically examine representations of fat in health and medical sciences, the Health at Every Size model, the pharmaceutical industry, psychology, sociology, cultural studies, legal issues, literature, pedagogy, art, theater, popular culture, media studies, and activism.

Fat Studies is an interdisciplinary, international field of scholarship that critically examines societal attitudes and practices about body weight and appearance. Fat Studies advocates equality for all people regardless of body size. It explores the way fat people are oppressed, the reasons why, who benefits from that oppression and how to liberate fat people from oppression. Fat Studies seeks to challenge and remove the negative associations that society has about fat and the fat body. It regards weight, like height, as a human characteristic that varies widely across any population. Fat Studies is similar to academic disciplines that focus on race, ethnicity, gender, or age.

FYI. CFP: Special issue of Fat Studies – Fat on the small screen: Televising fat

FYI.

CFP – Special Issue of Fat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society on “Fat on the Small Screen: Televising Fat,” edited by Daniel Farr

Dfarr4@kennesaw.edu

Proposal deadline: July 10, 2018

Manuscript invitations: July 20, 2018

Manuscript deadline: November 2, 2018

This special Issue of Fat Studies will explore the myriad ways that fat is portrayed and theorized on television.  In an era of growing visibility in television programs, fat bodies and identities are portrayed in diverse and sometimes contradictory manners.  The spectrum of body type/size and types of programs affiliated with those living fat lives vary from normalization and acceptance, to the medicalization and denigration of fat.  This issue seeks to explore the variety of fat identities, imagery, and portrayals found across television programming.

This issue aims to bring together explorations of specific programmatic and story-line focused fat imagery across genre of teen/family/sitcom programming, but to also explore the spectrum of reality-based imagery about fat lives.  We hope to examine the often dichotomous, complex, and at times contradictory treatment of fat—is fat to be accepted and treated with respect?  Is it to be treated with tolerance? Is it to be rejected? Perhaps there is a spectrum of “acceptable” levels of fat, based on qualitative or even quantifiable measures?

Along with a focus upon the imagery and its meaning, we also seek contributions that examine how audiences are receiving these images.  How are consumers watching, thinking about, and seeking out programming about fat?  What does this imagery mean to them? Do these programs change how people think about their lives? Does it change their behaviors?

This issue seeks to include contributions from a range of disciplines, methods, and theoretical approaches to forward understandings of the imagery that is being created.

Given the dual goals of this issue to explore fat imagery and audience reception, a variety of topics and programs will be considering, including, but not limited to:

  • Analyses of TV programs with a specific focus upon/inclusion of fat character story-lines
  • Gendering of fat – how are men portrayed?Women? Comparisons?
  • Intersections of fat with race/ethnicity, sexuality, class, etc.
  • Reality programming
  • Fat imagery of children/teens
  • Fat/thin imagery and character arcs
  • Cartoon imagery
  • Transformations of fat imagery over the history of television
  • Global discourses and variations on fat imagery on television
  • Audience and consumer responses

To be considered for this issue, please submit a 250-500 word proposal (or full paper draft) and brief bio or vita to Daniel Farr (dfarr4@kennesaw.edu) by July 10, 2018.  Any questions about this special issue may also be directed to this email.

Pending proposal acceptance, draft manuscripts will be expected by December 1, 2018.  Submission should be between 3,000 and 6,000 words (10-15 pages, size 12 font, double spaced) including all notes and references.  Manuscripts will be sent for peer review.

Reproductions of visual images will require permission from the artists/ copyright holders of the image(s). All authors will need to sign a form that transfers copyright of their article to the publisher, Taylor & Francis/ Routledge.

Fat Studies is the first academic journal in the field of scholarship that critically examines theory, research, practices, and programs related to body weight and appearance. Content includes original research and overviews exploring the intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, sexuality, age, ability, and socioeconomic status. Articles critically examine representations of fat in health and medical sciences, the Health at Every Size model, the pharmaceutical industry, psychology, sociology, cultural studies, legal issues, literature, pedagogy, art, theater, popular culture, media studies, and activism.

Fat Studies is an interdisciplinary, international field of scholarship that critically examines societal attitudes and practices about body weight and appearance. Fat Studies advocates equality for all people regardless of body size. It explores the way fat people are oppressed, the reasons why, who benefits from that oppression and how to liberate fat people from oppression. Fat Studies seeks to challenge and remove the negative associations that society has about fat and the fat body. It regards weight, like height, as a human characteristic that varies widely across any population. Fat Studies is similar to academic disciplines that focus on race, ethnicity, gender, or age.

FYI. Fat Studies MOOO (like a MOOC, only FAT)

FYI. Fat Studies MOOO featuring Prof Esther Rothblum, 3rd June 2018

Via Dr Cat Pausé, Massey University, NZ, @FriendofMarilyn

“As a Fat Studies academic, I’m delighted at the number of undergrad and grad students who are interested in studying Fat Studies. I’ve met them all over the world! Some want to take a course or two, some wish for a qualification in the discipline, and some would hope to acquire a terminal degree.

Unfortunately, nowhere in the world can you earn a qualification in Fat Studies. Some FS courses exist, mainly in the US, but neoliberal Universities are culling disciplines such as Women’s Studies, Queer Studies, Indigenous Studies – not supporting new ones. That’s why it’s important we support each other in our quest to study – learn – build – the discipline of Fat Studies. We share texts, we host conferences, we cultivate FB groups and Tumblrs, we share our lived experiences and connect with one another as best we can.

For my part, I act as an unofficial supervisor to many PhD students around the world; allowing them a space to talk about our epistemologies, and methodologies, and ontologies. To listen to rants about supervisors who just don’t get it, and share in the joy when something clicks. I also participate in #FatStudyGroup, a great tag created by @KivaBay as a way to co-construct our knowledge and share our literature with one another. It’s important work to do, and critical to building our field. And that’s why I’ve created the Fat Studies MOOO.

It isn’t a MOOC – it’s not an online course taking place over several weeks/months. Instead, it’s discrete events that will happen once a month. Guest scholars will bring their expertise on a topic within Fat Studies to share with a small group. I’ve envisioned this as a resource for students who are eager for a chance to take a course in Fat Studies, but it’s open to anyone – student – academic – activist – anyone – who wants to build their understanding of this field.

The first Fat Studies MOOO finds us in the company of Professor Esther Rothblum, exploring the discipline itself. Each month, a new scholar and a new topic. I’ve reached out to Fat Studies scholars from across the world. They are an incredible group of scholars and incredibly generous to share their wisdom. If you’d like to learn more, you can read the info here: https://friendofmarilyn.com/fat-studies-mooo/

And if you’d like to participate in the first one, register at https://tinyurl.com/fsmooo1

WSC 2018: We really need your help

It’s just over one month to go now till this year’s Weight Stigma Conference in Leeds, UK, and we are still trying to reach our crowdfunding goal for the Bursary Fund.

As many of you know, this conference started in 2013 and we have always done our best to keep prices as low as possible. Although we’re much bigger than we were, and it’s not £15 any more, we work on a break-even basis to keep things as financially viable for as many people as possible. This means we don’t have a lot of cash to pay for financial assistance. Instead, we seek out sponsorship (huge should out to our amazing present and past sponsors). And for the last few years we have also tried to crowdfund some money for bursaries. So far this year, we have enough for five bursaries (equivalent to free registration), plus one travel grant donated one of our amazing delegates, who included a $500 donation in her funding request for her own travel and was awarded it. But we still need 3 to 5 more bursaries (about £600) and there isn’t much time left.

Thank you to those of you who have already donated, either this year or in the past. If you haven’t, and could spare even a little, we have a GoFundMe page at: https://www.gofundme.com/stigmaconf2018

ALL donations and social media shares are very much appreciated. If you are attending this year and haven’t registered yet, you can make a donation at registration. (Also, get on with it already!!)

All of this money is ring-fenced to provide financial assistance to those who need it to attend, with priority given to people who have been accepted to present their work. We want to make this conference, and this field, accessible to more people.

We are also still seeking sponsorship. Please contact us on stigmaconf@gmail.com if you are interested in taking out sponsorship of the WSC for your business. In addition to delegates at the event, we have very good traffic on our website. We can provide more details and work out a sponsorship package to suit any business.

Finally, if you’re thinking of attending and/or presenting there’s still a few days for submission of poster abstracts. Visit the website: stigmaconference.com for more information.

Thank you again for helping us make this happen.

Hope to see you there!

Best,

Angela Meadows

One week left to submit poster abstracts

One week till poster deadline!

Don’t forget to submit your poster abstracts for the 6th Annual International Weight Stigma Conference before the deadline on 15th May! For more information and abstract submission, visit https://stigmaconference.com/abstract-submission/

And make sure to sign up for updates on our website for all the latest conference news.

FYI. Empowered Bodies Conference: Call for abstracts (short deadline)

FYI.

Empowered Bodies: PG Students Conference 2018

Date: 26th of June 2018. University of York

Keynote Speakers:

  • Professor Karen Throsby / Unviersity of Leeds
  • Professor Nick Crossley / University of Manchester

We are pleased to announce our Postgraduate Conference for students and researchers interested in the role of the body in social sciences and the concept of embodiment as a source of critical reflection in diverse disciplines. We invite abstracts that deal with embodiment in any thematic or methodological way, from a diverse range of disciplines like Gender Studies, Politics, Philosophy, Geography, Arts, Health, Media, STS, Social Policy and any other approach.

Topics include (but are not limited to):

• Power, gender and identity

• Politics of the body

• Body transformations

• Health, Food and Practices

• Disabilities, agency and control

• Affect and Emotions

• Technology, humans and cyborgs

• Body as Mediation

• Arts, performance and creation

• Cultural representations of the body

• Measurement, tracking and datification of the self

Masters and PhD Students are particularly encouraged to submit an abstract, as well as other postgraduate students in early stages of analysis, as this is an excellent chance to present your work in a constructive and supportive environment. We also welcome works in progress by any other level of early career researchers.

If you are interested in presenting a paper, please submit an abstract of up to 300 words to empowered-bodies@york.ac.uk by Weds 18th of April 2018 at 5:00 pm. (NOTE: If you cannot pull together an abstract by Wednesday but think you could get one in shortly after, just drop them a line.)

We also welcome any other form of presentation or performance such music, dance, video, etc. as long as it can be fitted within the program. Please send us your idea with your abstract, and try to be as specific as possible of any technical or room requirements and the kind of activity that you would like to present.

Please direct all enquires to empowered-bodies@york.ac.uk

Registration open at: https://www.york.ac.uk/sociology/about/department/2018/empoweredbodiesphdconf2018/


Weight Stigma Conference latest:

A big thank you to our major sponsor: Frontiers journals. For a full list of sponsors of WSC 2018, click here.

WSC 2018: Early-bird registration ending soon!

Don’t forget, early-bird registration for this year’s Weight Stigma Conference ends on 15th April. Full rates apply from the 16th. Book your place now: https://stigmaconference.com/registration-2018/

Late-breaking research posters for WSC 2018

The abstract submission portal is now open for late-breaking research posters. If you didn’t meet the initial poster deadline or if your results are only now available, you now have a second chance to submit. The submission portal will remain open until 15th May.

Note, if you have already submitted an abstract and indicated that your results will be available prior to the conference, you do not need to submit again through the portal. Simply send us your updated abstract as previously agreed.

FYI. Call for abstracts – special issue of Fat Studies: Fatness and Law

FYI

Call for papers: “Fatness and Law”

A special issue of Fat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society, guest edited by Stephanie von Liebenstein (fatness-law@gmx.de)

This issue will examine questions around the relationship between fatness and law (in the widest sense). It will highlight work supporting the establishment of weight as a protected class in antidiscrimination legislation and the development of legal practices acknowledging the right to be fat as a human rights issue. While the analysis of legislation to end the “obesity epidemic”, for instance, may provide valuable insights into the political workings of the legislative process, one main focus of this issue will lie on legal efforts aimed at improving the legal situation of fat people. Featuring both practical and theoretical approaches, the issue might address topics such as legal conceptions of fatness and discrimination, legal aspects of the relationships between fatness and employment, health care, children and youth, public law, education etc., laws and ordinances to fight “obesity”, but also e.g. the question why international weight-related antidiscrimination legislation has as yet produced so little litigation.

The issue invites contributions across a wide range of disciplines and methodological and theoretical approaches within fat studies. International voices discussing case law and legislation in countries other than the US are particularly welcome. Equally so are intersectional approaches and perspectives from other marginalized groups on weight-related legal struggles.

Potential topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • fat people as legal subjects/fat people in court
  • weight as a discrimination category
  • fatness and fundamental rights
  • framing “fatness” in legal discourse/in litigation/in legal theory
  • intersecting identities, fatness, and law/legal theory
  • fatness, gender, and law
  • fatness, employment, and law
  • public accommodations, fatness, and law
  • fatness, public health, and law
  • fatness, health care, and law
  • fatness and disability rights
  • fatness, bullying, and the right to education
  • fatness and various other areas of law (insurance law, criminal law, youth welfare law etc.)
  • laws/ordinances aimed at fighting “obesity” and their impacts
  • law, politics, and fatness
  • fat activism aimed at improving the legal situation of fat people
  • learning from other marginalized groups’ legal struggles
  • development of criteria for what characteristics should be protected under antidiscrimination legislation
  • fatness, law, and the limits of law

To be considered for inclusion in this special issue, please send a 250-500 word abstract and outline of your projected paper and a current CV to Stephanie von Liebenstein, fatness-law@gmx.de by June 15th, 2018. Any questions about the topic can also be directed to this e-mail.

Final submissions should be between 3000-6000 words, including all notes and references, and should be received by December 31st, 2018. If you wish to include reproductions of visual images with your paper, you will need to receive permission to do so from the artists/copyright holders of the image(s).  All authors will need to sign a form that transfers copyright of their article to the publisher, Taylor & Francis/Routledge.

Fat Studies is the first academic journal in the field of scholarship that critically examines theory, research, practices, and programs related to body weight and appearance. Content includes original research and overviews exploring the intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, sexuality, age, ability, and socioeconomic status. Articles critically examine representations of fat in health and medical sciences, the Health at Every Size model, the pharmaceutical industry, psychology, sociology, cultural studies, legal issues, literature, pedagogy, art, theater, popular culture, media studies, and activism.

Fat Studies is an interdisciplinary, international field of scholarship that critically examines societal attitudes and practices about body weight and appearance. Fat Studies advocates equality for all people regardless of body size. It explores the way fat people are oppressed, the reasons why, who benefits from that oppression and how to liberate fat people from oppression. Fat Studies seeks to challenge and remove the negative associations that society has about fat and the fat body. It regards weight, like height, as a human characteristic that varies widely across any population. Fat Studies is similar to academic disciplines that focus on race, ethnicity, gender, or age.