8th Annual Weight Stigma Conference

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2020 Weight Stigma Conference cancelled

It is with much disappointment that we are announcing that this year’s Weight Stigma Conference will be cancelled. Given the fast developing nature of the public health situation, we have decided that is no longer feasible to go ahead with the event this year. We are hoping we will be able to hold the conference as planned in 2021. Please sign up for notifications to be kept informed of dates, location, abstract submission etc.

From all the conference team, we wish you all good health during this difficult time.

WSC 2020 coronavirus update

We would like to give you an update on the status of the 2020 Weight Stigma Conference, in light of the current public health situation. As you might expect, we are taking the implications of COVID-19 very seriously and are keeping track of evolving national and global conditions in our ongoing efforts to assess the situation and provide a safe environment for our presenters and delegates.

At the time of this writing, WSC 2020 will go ahead as planned. Alongside our concerns for the wellbeing and safety of our community, we do not want to contribute to an acceleration of panic. We acknowledge that broader elements of xenophobia and isolationism are being expressed under the guise of concern for some. We wish to promote solidarity within our community and support the livelihoods of the local communities in which we live and work. Our working principle is that scholarship and activism must continue, and meeting in-person is an essential component of this.

We are aware that a number of institutions have now applied bans on non-essential travel, but most are planning to revisit the situation around the second or third week of April. Given this, it seems prudent to postpone making firm decisions about possible cancellations until the end of April, taking into account the advice given by the New Zealand Ministry of Health and Ministry of Foreign Affairs at that time regarding the evolving national and global situation with respect to progression of the coronavirus outbreak and containment measures required.

While we do not advise booking travel to New Zealand at this time, it would be helpful to us to have an idea of how many people would be wishing to attend provided that travel is still running smoothly to and from New Zealand. As such, if you are still hoping to be able to attend, we would be grateful if you would go ahead and register for the conference here: https://stigmaconference.com/registration-2020/

**Note: All registrations will be refunded in full in the event that the conference is cancelled.**

Please do not hesitate to reach out with any questions or concerns you may have. For now, we wish you all good health and hope we are able to see as many of you as possible in Auckland in June.

Useful links:

2020 Weight Stigma Conference registration now open

8th Annual International Weight Stigma Conference, 22–23 June, 2020

Auckland, New Zealand

REGISTER NOW: Get Early Bird Rates

We are delighted to announce that registration for the 8th Annual International Weight Stigma Conference is now open. The two-day interdisciplinary program will cover the entire weight stigma research spectrum—from basic, to applied, to clinical, to policy—and feature an outstanding roster of international speakers and local experts.

We are honoured to present our keynote speakers for this year’s Weight Stigma Conference:

  • Dr Lindo Bacon is an internationally recognized authority on topics related to nutrition, weight and health. A professor and researcher, for almost two decades Dr. Bacon has taught courses in social justice, health, weight and nutrition. Dr. Bacon is author of the iconic and bestselling Health at Every Size: The Surprising Truth about Your Weight and co-author, with Lucy Aphramor, of Body Respect: What Conventional Health Books Get Wrong, Leave Out, or Just Fail to Understand about Weight. They are committed to centralizing the ways in which power, privilege and disadvantage complicate our experience of our bodies. lindobacon.com
  • Dr Isaac Warbrick (Ngāti Te Ata, Te Arawa, Ngā Puhi) is an exercise physiologist, Senior Research Fellow and Co-Director of Taupua Waiora Centre for Māori Health Research at AUT University. Dr Warbrick’s research has focused on the impact of physical activity on the health and well-being of Māori with a particular focus on Māori men. Much of his research is conducted at the interface between biomedical, lab-based, and indigenous approaches to research. His most recent publications have questioned whether ‘weight’ and ‘weight loss’ are appropriate ‘health’ measures for Māori, suggesting that outcome measures should better reflect cultural values.
  • Kimberly Dark is a writer, professor and storyteller, working to reveal the hidden architecture of everyday life so that we can reclaim our
    power as social creators. In her new essay collection, Fat, Pretty and Soon to be Old, Kimberly navigates her experience of being fat since childhood—as well as queer, white-privileged, a gender-conforming “girl with a pretty face,” active then disabled, and inevitably aging, blending storytelling and social analysis to create a deeper understanding of how appearance privilege and stigma function in everyday life and how the architecture of this social world constrains us, and how we can each build a more just social world, one interaction at a timekimberlydark.com

The Weight Stigma Conference is an inter-disciplinary event that brings together scholars and practitioners from a range of backgrounds (e.g., public health, government and public policy, psychology, medicine, sociology, anthropology, allied health professions, education, sports and exercise science, social sciences, media studies, business, law, activism, and the lay public) to consider research, policy, rhetoric, and practice around the issue of weight stigma. For more information, visit: stigmaconference.com


Abstract submission

Abstract submission for oral presentations and conference sessions is now closed. We will continue to accept submissions for poster presentations until 31st May 2020, and will make acceptance decisions on a weekly rolling basis – so you will know within one week of submission if your abstract has been accepted. For more information, visit: https://stigmaconference.com/abstract-submission/


Bursary Fund – Supporting Accessibility

The Weight Stigma Conference is a not-for-profit event. Although we try and keep prices down, we realise that the conference will nevertheless be beyond some people’s means. Rather than raising the cost of tickets, we will make every effort to raise additional funding through donations and sponsorship to allow us to give bursaries to individuals who otherwise wouldn’t be able to attend.

A Donation option is available on the registration website for both delegates and non-attendees who are in a position to contribute a little extra to help us provide financial assistance where needed. Alternatively, donations can be made via our GoFundMe page. Thank you for your generosity.

If you are interested in formal sponsorship of the event, please contact us for more information.


Registration

The Weight Stigma Conference is a not-for-profit event. We have a single ticket price for all delegates that covers the two-day event and a reception on the first evening.

  • Early bird registration (until 30th April 2020): NZD 225
  • Standard registration (from 1 May 2020): NZD 300

A small number of bursaries may be available for individuals on low incomes. Please email us for more information. A Donation button is also available on the ticketing website if you would like to make a small (or large) contribution. Donations will be used to provide financial assistance for individuals who might otherwise be unable to attend. Thank you. You may also donate on our Go Fund Me page.

Please click on the ‘Register Now’ button below to be taken to the ticketing website.

REGISTER NOW


Fat Studies Conference, 18–19 June, 2020, Auckland, NZ

We are delighted to co-locate our conference this year with the Fat Studies: Past, Present and Futures conference, being held in Auckland on the 18th and 19th June. The two-day conference will include keynote presentations from Professor Esther Rothblum and Sonya Renee Taylor,  founder of The Body is Not an Apology, as well as community events and a conference dinner. Online-only tickets are also available. For more information about FSNZ2020, please visit http://fsnz.org/. Note, early-bird registration for FSNZ2020 ends on 31st March.

WSC 2020: Keynotes announced

Keynote Speakers

We are thrilled to announce the keynote speakers for the 8th Annual International Weight Stigma Conference will be Lindo Bacon, Isaac Warbrick, and Kimberly Dark. Check out their bios below.

Abstract deadline reminder

Don’t forget that session and oral presentation abstracts are due Monday 17th. Visit the website for more information and to submit your abstract. Posters submissions will be reviewed on a rolling basis.

Weight Stigma Conference Bursary Fund

For the past few years, we have been crowdfunding a bursary fund to help make the conference more accessible for people who might otherwise not be able to attend. All donations are very gratefully received. You can make a donation at:

  • https://www.gofundme.com/f/wsc2020
  • On our website homepage: stigmaconference.com
  • At time of registration. Note registration is not yet open. The WSC is a not-for-profit and registration is costed at break-even levels. We are currently finalising this year’s budget and will be able to calculate delegate costs and open registration as soon as that has been done.

Speaker bios

Dr Lindo Bacon

Lindo Bacon Ph.D. is an internationally recognized authority on topics related to nutrition, weight and health. Dr. Bacon’s academic training includes two Masters’ Degrees, one in Psychotherapy, specializing in Eating Disorders and Body Image, and the other in Exercise Science, specializing in Metabolism. They also earned a Ph.D. in Physiology with a Nutrition emphasis from the University of California. A professor and researcher, for almost two decades Dr. Bacon has taught courses in social justice, health, weight and nutrition; they have also conducted federally funded studies on health and weight and published in top scientific journals.

Dr. Bacon is author of the iconic and bestselling Health at Every Size: The Surprising Truth about Your Weight. Their more recent co-authored release Body Respect: What Conventional Health Books Get Wrong, Leave Out, or Just Fail to Understand about Weight, has already found its way into the heart of the weight discourse, transforming the way we think about weight and health, and offering an alternative path to compassionate and effective health care. Dr. Bacon is committed to centralizing the ways in which power, privilege and disadvantage complicate our experience of our bodies. Health professionals – as well as people on their own personal journeys to body appreciation – call Lindo’s work “life-changing” and “transformative,” providing the tools and confidence for personal change and inspiring others. Their forthcoming book, Radical Belonging: How to Survive and Thrive in an Unjust World (and Transform it for the Better), takes their inspiring message beyond size, to shaping a culture of empathy, equity and true belonging. Website: lindobacon.com            Twitter: @LindoBaconX         Instagram: lindobacon

Dr Isaac Warbrick

Dr. Isaac Warbrick (Ngāti Te Ata, Te Arawa, Ngā Puhi) is an exercise physiologist, Senior Research Fellow and Co-Director of Taupua Waiora Centre for Māori Health Research at AUT University.  The Taupua Waiora Centre is part of the National Institute of Public Health and Mental Health Research. It is a multi-disciplinary research group specialising in hauora Māori. The mission of Taupua Waiora is to promote whānau ora, and positive health experiences for Māori whānau. A core aim is to make significant contributions aimed at reducing health and social inequities in Māori health, by improving evidence and knowledge that will enhance access and use of health and associated services, and promote positive outcomes and hauora for Māori whānau, hapū, iwi and communities.

Dr Warbrick’s research has focused on the impact of physical activity on the health and well-being of Māori with a particular focus on Māori men. Much of his research is conducted at the interface between biomedical, lab-based, and indigenous approaches to research. Isaac is currently leading projects and collaborating with researchers in a variety of fields including exercise physiology, Māori health, epigenetics, men’s health, racism and health, and the use of traditional knowledge, such as the maramataka, on Māori health. His most recent publications have questioned whether ‘weight’ and ‘weight loss’ are appropriate ‘health’ measures for Māori, suggesting that outcome measures should better reflect cultural values.

Kimberly Dark

Kimberly Dark is a writer, professor and storyteller, working to reveal the hidden architecture of everyday life so that we can reclaim our power as social creators.  She’s the author of Fat, Pretty and Soon to be Old, The Daddies and Love and Errors, and her essays, stories and poetry are widely published in academic and popular online publications alike. Two of her contributions to Fat Studies Journal were among the top ten most read of 2019. Her ability to make the personal political is grounded in her training as a sociologist, and you can find her course offerings in Sociology at Cal State San Marcos and Writing/Arts at Cal State Summer Arts.

Kimberly’s essay collection, Fat, Pretty, and Soon to be Old is a moving, funny, and startlingly frank collection of personal essays about what it means to look a certain way. Or rather, certain ways. Navigating Kimberly Dark’s experience of being fat since childhood—as well as queer, white-privileged, a gender-conforming “girl with a pretty face,” active then disabled, and inevitably aging—each piece blends storytelling and social analysis to deftly coax readers into a deeper understanding of how appearance privilege (and stigma) function in everyday life and how the architecture of this social world constrains us. At the same time, she provides a blueprint for how each of us can build a more just social world, one interaction at a time.Website: kimberlydark.com     Twitter: @kimberlydark      Instagram: kimberly.dark

 

WSC 2020 abstract deadline extension

Abstract deadline extended

We will be extending the abstract submission deadline for conference sessions (workshops, seminars, symposia etc.) until Monday 17th February. Submissions for standard oral presentations are also due 17th February. Posters will be reviewed on a rolling basis. For more information and to submit an abstract, please visit stigmaconference.com

If you are interested in presenting a session but are unsure about the suitability or format, please email us and we will be happy to discuss with you.

Weight Stigma Conference Bursary Fund

For the past few years, we have been crowdfunding a bursary fund to help make the conference more accessible for people who might otherwise not be able to attend. All donations are very gratefully received. You can make a donation at:

  • https://www.gofundme.com/f/wsc2020
  • On our website homepage: stigmaconference.com
  • At time of registration. Note registration is not yet open. The WSC is a not-for-profit and registration is costed at break-even levels. We are currently finalising this year’s budget and will be able to calculate delegate costs and open registration as soon as that has been done.

FYI. Special issue of Psychology of Women Quarterly: Feminist psychology and open science – challenges and opportunities

FYI.

Dear colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a forthcoming special issue of Psychology of Women Quarterly on Feminist Psychology and Open Science: Challenges and Opportunities. See below for details about the issue and information about proposals.

Background and aims

In recent years, sparked by evidence of data fraud, questionable research practices, and low rates of replicability, there has been an increased push to make psychological research more open and transparent (Shrout & Rodgers, 2018). The open science movement has diverse goals, most of which focus on increasing the validity and reproducibility of scientific research (Hesse, 2018; Nosek et al., 2015). For a variety of reasons, the introduction of open science has polarized the field and remains a controversial topic for many social scientists (see Mirowski, 2018). The unique challenges and opportunities that open science poses for feminist psychologists have yet to be systematically considered. Psychological science has historically silenced and devalued the perspectives of women and other marginalized groups (MacArthur & Shields, 2014), and the open science movement is no exception (GenderAction, 2019). Feminist psychology has long played a role in destabilizing patriarchal norms and customs in the field by challenging traditional methodologies and research practices and creating space for women’s voices and experiences (Eagly, Eaton, Rose, Riger, & McHugh, 2012). The goal of this special issue is to present a diversity of feminist psychologists’ perspectives on open science and its application to and implications for feminist psychological research.

In this special issue, we pose several questions:

  • What are the benefits and disadvantages of engaging in open science practices for feminist psychologists? What are the barriers to successfully engaging with open science, and how can we facilitate a culture in which the use of open methods is more normative? Should we?
  • Is open science a promising way forward for feminist psychology, or is it an imperative that may further silence and censor feminist psychologists?
  • In what ways do the goals of the open science movement complement or contradict the goals of feminist psychology? How might a growing emphasis on “replication” and “reproducibility” in the open science movement undermine the significance of critical feminist research, particularly qualitative methods (e.g., storytelling, participatory action research, grounded theory, phenomenology, discourse analysis)?
  • How has the open science initiative improved or challenged your own work as a feminist researcher? How can feminist psychologists integrate open science practices into their own research, perhaps in unconventional or negotiated ways?

We invite submissions to the special issue that consider these questions and related ideas on the relation between feminist psychology and open science.

Manuscript Submission

 Submissions for initial consideration should consist of detailed abstracts of 2 double-spaced pages followed by a short biography (limited to half a page) of each author. Manuscript submissions will be peer reviewed and invitation of a full paper (following abstract submission) does not guarantee publication. We encourage and will strive for a diversity of voices from feminist psychologists.

Submit detailed abstracts and biographies by April 15th, 2020, to Jaclyn Siegel at jsiegel3@uwo.ca. Questions and inquiries may also be directed to any of the other guest editors (Dr. Rachel Calogero, Dr. Asia Eaton, or Dr. Tomi-Ann Roberts). Approximately 6-10 papers will be selected for the final issue. The special issue editors plan to notify authors of selection decisions by mid-June 2020.

If your abstract results in an invitation to submit a full manuscript, completed manuscripts will be due October 15th, 2020. Manuscripts must be prepared according to the Manuscript Submission information available on the Psychology of Women Quarterly home page (https://journals.sagepub.com/home/pwq) and submitted electronically through the journal’s manuscript submission portal (https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/pwq).

We look forward to reading your proposals.

Sincerely,
Jaclyn Siegel, M.S. (jsiegel3@uwo.ca)
Rachel Calogero, Ph.D. (rcaloger@uwo.ca)
Asia Eaton, Ph.D. (aeaton@fiu.edu)
Tomi-Ann Roberts, Ph.D. (troberts@coloradocollege.edu)

References

Eagly, A. H., Eaton, A., Rose, S. M., Riger, S., & McHugh, M. C. (2012). Feminism and Psychology: Analysis of a half-century of research on women and gender. American Psychologist, 67(2), 211-230.

GenderAction (2019). Report on strategic advice for enhancing the gender dimension of open science and innovation policy. Retrieved from https://genderaction.eu › GENDERACTION_Report-5.1_D11_OSOI.pdf

Hesse, B. W. (2018). Can psychology walk the walk of open science? American Psychologist, 73(2), 126–137.

MacArthur, H., & Shields, S. (2014). Psychology’s Feminist Voices: A critical pedagogical tool. Sex Roles, 70(9), 431-433.

Mirowski, P. (2018). The future(s) of open science. Social Studies of Science, 48(2), 171-203.

Nosek, B. A., Alter, G., Banks, G. C., Borsboom, D., Bowman, S. D., & … Yarkoni, T. (2015)

Rodgers, J. L., & Shrout, P. E. (2018). Psychology’s replication crisis as scientific opportunity: A précis for policymakers.” Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 5(1), 134–141.

Shrout, P. E., & Rodgers, J. L. (2018). Psychology, science, and knowledge construction: Broadening perspectives from the replication crisis. Annual Review of Psychology, 69, 487-510. doi:10.1146/annurev-psych-122216-011845

Abstract deadline reminder

Just a reminder that abstract submission for conference sessions (workshops, seminars, symposia etc.) are due one week today, on Monday 3rd February. Submissions for standard oral presentations are due 17th February. Posters will be reviewed on a rolling basis. For more information and to submit an abstract, please visit stigmaconference.com

Weight Stigma Conference Bursary Fund

For the past few years, we have been crowdfunding a bursary fund to help make the conference more accessible for people who might otherwise not be able to attend. All donations are very gratefully received. You can make a donation at:

  • https://www.gofundme.com/f/wsc2020
  • On our website homepage: stigmaconference.com
  • At time of registration. Note registration is not yet open. The WSC is a not-for-profit and registration is costed at break-even levels. We are currently finalising this year’s budget and will be able to calculate delegate costs and open registration as soon as that has been done.

Weight Stigma Conference 2020: Call for abstracts

8th Annual International Weight Stigma Conference, 22-23 June, 2020, Auckland, New Zealand

Call for abstracts:

The Annual International Weight Stigma Conference is an inter-disciplinary event that brings together scholars and practitioners from a range of backgrounds (e.g., public health, government and public policy, psychology, medicine, sociology, anthropology, allied health professions, education, sports and exercise science, social sciences, media studies, business, law, activism, and the lay public) to consider research, policy, rhetoric, and practice around the issue of weight stigma.

We are now accepting abstracts for oral presentations and posters, as well as session proposals including brief symposia, round tables, debates, and workshops. We are also interested in non-traditional submissions (e.g. media, performance, art). The two-day interdisciplinary programme will cover the entire weight stigma research spectrum – from basic, to applied, to clinical, to policy – and feature an outstanding roster of international speakers and local experts.

For more information about the conference and to submit an abstract, please visit: stigmaconference.com.

Submission deadlines: Session proposals Monday 3rd February; Oral presentations Monday 17th February; Posters will be reviewed on a rolling basis.

FYI. NSF Social Psychology Program Director Job Opportunity

FYI.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is currently recruiting a rotating Program Director for the Social Psychology Program.  The formal announcement is posted on the USAJobs website at:  https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/555014800

Rotating Program Directors at NSF typically serve for one or two years, managing a disciplinary program in their areas of expertise.  The Social Psychology Program is supported by two Program Directors.

Candidates must have a Ph.D. in Behavioral Science, plus after award of the Ph.D., six or more years of successful research, research administration, and/or managerial experience pertinent to the position.

This announcement is open to (All US Citizens OR current NSF employees) who meet citizenship and eligibility requirements.
Federal Appropriations Law requires that Non-Citizens meet certain eligibility criteria to be considered. Therefore, Non-Citizens must certify eligibility by signing and attaching this Citizenship Affidavit to their application. Non-citizens who do not provide the affidavit at the time of application will not be considered.

Relocation expenses MAY be paid contingent upon the availability of funds. NSF has determined that all of its positions are eligible for telework. Work suitable for telework depends on job duties; therefore, employees must receive approval from their supervisor for telework and have a telework agreement in place. Entering into a telework agreement is voluntary.

Salary: $142,443 to $182,627 per year

Deadline: 20 Jan 2020

More info

FYI. Fat Studies Conference, New Zealand: Call for submissions

We are so excited to be holding the 8th Annual International Weight Stigma Conference in Auckland, New Zealand in June 2020. We’ve chosen this location to coincide with the third Fat Studies Conference, hosted by Dr Cat Pausé at Massey University in Auckland. So two conferences and one holiday of a lifetime!

Call for papers for FSC is now out. See below. Call for papers for the WSC will go out in January.

FYI.

Venue: Massey University, Auckland New Zealand

Date: 18-19 June, 2020

Abstract submission deadline: 15 Feb 2020

Early bird registration closes: 1 April 2020

Contact: Cat Pausé, PhD  c.pause@massey.ac.nz

We are pleased to invite papers for possible inclusion in the upcoming Fat Studies: Past, Present, Futures. This conference will provide for academics and activists to consider our fat pasts, our fat present, and our fat futures. We welcome papers and performances from academics, researchers, intellectuals, scholars, activists, and artists, in any field of study, and at any stage in their career.

Our keynotes are Professor Esther Rothblum and the founder of The Body is Not an Apology, Sonya Renee Taylor; and we expect contributors from around the world. Community events will take place the night before FSNZ20 and the closing night of FSNZ20. We encourage all attendees to plan to attend both community events (Wed, Fri), and the conference dinner (Thurs).

Fat Studies is a post-disciplinary field of study that confronts and critiques cultural constraints against notions of “fatness” and “the fat body”; explores fat bodies as they live in, are shaped by, and remake the world; and theorises how society conceptualises and pathologises fat bodies. Fat Studies scholars identify and discuss mainstream and alternative discourses on fatness, analyse size as a social justice issue at the intersection of oppression, and critically appraise size oppression as it is manifested in various societal institutions (medicine, media, education, etc).

All submissions are welcome, but please ensure your proposal fits within the academic framework of Fat Studies. Please also be mindful that Fat Studies is an academic discipline and not merely an umbrella term for all discussions of fat bodies. Additionally, we encourage submitters to rethink using words like “obesity” and “overweight” in their presentations unless they are used ironically, within quotes, or accompanied by a political analysis.

In your submission, please include the title of your paper/presentation, an abstract, a short bio, a photo, and a Twitter/Instagram hashtag if appropriate. Topics may include, but are not limited to

  • Fat Indigeneity
  • Queering fat
  • Fat histories
  • Disrupting fatness
  • Living fat
  • Biopolitics of fatness
  • Cross-cultural or global constructions of fatness and fat bodies
  • Geography and lived experience of fatness and fat bodies
  • Theoretical and methodological approaches to understanding the construction, pathologisation, and/or representations, of fatness
  • Fat futures

Abstracts should be submitted as an attachment to fsnz20@massey.ac.nz. Files should be named with the author’s surname followed by _fs2020 (Jones_fs2020). Please include contact information in the body of the email, and ensure your submission includes the title of your paper/presentation, an abstract, a short bio, a photo, and a Twitter/Instagram hashtag if appropriate. The abstracts of all work presented at the conference will be published in the conference proceedings. All presentations will be live streamed for the online audience, and will be available on demand for one year.

Activists and students are especially welcome to submit.

Informal enquiries concerning papers and topics are welcome before the deadline.